Make Use of Your Bear

Bear season is around the corner in September here in New Hampshire. Bears have been hunted since prehistoric times for meat, fur and lubricating/protection oil/grease for your gun metal and leather and for cooking and frying and so much more.

Bear Meat

Bear meat like pork contains the Trichinella parasite thus the meat must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees. I have eaten bear bear burger in chili and found that to be excellent. I am not a large fan of the meat per se but when cooked correctly and at the right temperature it is a great protein meat. I would use my pressure cooker to exceed the temperature needed and to tenderize it.   See from http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/pdf/bear_recipeguide.pdf

 

Bear Fur Rugs

Bear fur rugs are excellent if initially cared for after the kill by salting the hide and fast processing by a taxidermist.

Bear Grease & Oil

My brother was interested in making a bear grease years ago from a New Hampshire bear he killed and it worked well for leather and lubricating his rifle. The key for making the grease or oil is slow processing at lower temperatures so as not to cook/fry the fat at all. Here is a Wild Edible blog that provides the details. http://www.wildedible.com/blog/bear-grease-rendering-lard

Hunters for centuries used bear grease to lubricate and protect metal from rust and to soften and protect leather. Some say it is a great cooking grease too but I have never used it.

Bear Grease has been used for centuries by Native Americans and Settlers for

  • Waterproofing and conditioning leather
  • As a lubricant and anti-rust agent for metal and gun parts
  • Oil and grease for pastry making and for frying.
  • Making Soap
  • A great fire starter.
  • Medical; for Dry or Chapped Skin
  • For light as in lamp oil

The great part about rendered bear fat as a grease, the experts say, is that it does not require refrigeration but can be frozen too. Bear oil can also be part of the render process and it remains as an oil at room temperature.

So there you have it! Try doing more with your bear this year! © 2015

 

 

 

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About Ed Hale

I am an avid hunter with rifle and Bow and have been hunting for more than 50 years. I have taken big game such as whitetail deer, red deer, elk, Moose and African Plains game
such as Kudu, Gemsbok, Springbok, Blesbok, and Impala and wrote an ebook entitled African Safari -Rifle and Bow and Arrow on how to prepare for a first safari. Ed is a serious cartridge reloader and ballistics student. He has earned two degrees in science and has written hundreds of outdoor article on hunting with both bow and rifle.